Here’s To Another Motherless Mother’s Day

Mother’s Day is a day to honor your mother. When you’re mom isn’t in the picture anymore, the day is more filled with sorrow and tears.

What happens when you’re a mom yourself?

You’re forced to celebrate even if you’re secretly don’t want to without your own mom. You have no choice because you’re a mom yourself and it’s another motherless Mother’s Day if you like it or not. Your kid(s) want to celebrate you so let them.

You deserve today because you’re getting through another Mother’s Day without your own mom and a mom yourself.

Guess what?!?! You’re one brave and strong woman.

Why?

Because … you’re doing motherhood without your own mom. A lot of moms are always saying, “Oh, I don’t think I can survive motherhood without my mom.” Well, you know what, you’re doing just that. You’re getting through it every step of the way without the guidance most women have to help them through the newborn stages, the tantrums, potty training, and all the other crazy milestones… You’re doing all of this ALONE.

You should take the time and honor the fact that you are because you deserve it. You deserve to have one day to reflect on yourself and pat yourself on the back.

It’s your day. A day to honor all the achievements you do everyday as a mom yourself. You have the strength in yourself to get through today. If you can’t find it, just looks at your kid(s) because he or she is your strength. Your kid(s) are the reasons you get up every morning, so find the will to celebrate YOUR DAY for the smiling face(s) looking at you.

Are you still not convinced you can get through today? Then, read the tips below and the link attached to this sentence.

1) TRY YOUR BEST TO STAY OFF SOCIAL MEDIA!

Sorry for the caps, but this is the most important tip. Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram are all going to be filled with Mother’s Day post. You need to stay positive! Scrolling through your news feeds aren’t going to help your sanity. It’s only going to remind yourself how you’re a motherless mom on Mother’s Day. Remember what I said above, you’re more than that! You’re a mom too.

2) Make a post about your mom in her honor and your experience as a mom.

Just because you’re motherless doesn’t mean you can’t jump on the Mother’s Day post. You can honor her. Write something sweet about her like what kind of person she was or something you heard about her. You can even write something she taught you and how you’re teaching your kid(s) the same thing. Then, tie it up with why your experience with being a motherless mom makes you a stronger woman. Don’t forget to add a picture of your kid(s) and one of your mom.

After this post, FOLLOW NUMBER 1 and STAY OFF SOCIAL MEDIA!

3) Spend time with your kid(s).

The best part about being a motherless mom is having a kid or kids who love you and wants you to be happy. Yes, you heard me right … it’s the best part. You don’t have to be miserable because you’re a mom too. Your kid(s) is/are your world, so play or snuggle up and watch a movie together. The time will help you remember why you love being a mom and how you should celebrate today.

4) Get out of the house.

Don’t sit around the house feeling sorry for yourself. Go out! Celebrate your motherhood! You deserve every moment of Mother’s Day. Don’t forget that. It’s your day too.

5) Take the moment to honor your mom.

Yes, your mom is gone but you must honor her today. Do something she loved like planting flowers, go on a hike, etc. Make the time to remember her. She deserves that special time especially when on Mother’s Day. Your heart is going to let you forget her, so go celebrating her.

6) Write a letter to her.

I know this sounds stupid because she’s not going to get the letter in heaven. But you really should because YOU NEED to get out how you’re feeling about her absence. It’s important for your mental health. You shouldn’t be keeping all of your feeling inside. It’s not healthily. So write her a letter about what she messed this year with your kid(s) and how you feel about her leaving you. Writing is a great way to get out your negative thoughts. Just try it. If it’s not for you, then don’t do it again.

Warning: writing can bring on tears because you’ll be digging deep into your feelings about Mother’s Day.

7) Listen to music.

Put on music your kid(s) and you love to sing along to, so you can escape in the lyrics. Let loose and dance. Have fun. If you’re feeling brave add in a song, your mom loved and try to get through the song without crying. Take a deep breath and sing. Sing along and feel the lyrics. It’s not going to be easy but just try. If you fail, that’s okay because crying is okay too.

8) Cry.

Yes, you read this one right too. Cry because it’s good to let out all your feeling. Let the tears come down and take you over. A good cry helps your mind release all the pain you bottled up all day long. Try to cry alone if possible. It’s okay for your kid(s) to see you cry, but try to be alone. Just in case, you have a panic attack while you’re crying. It’s better your kid(s) don’t see that part. Why, because it may be scary for a kid or kid(s) to see you in that state of mind.

9) Tell your kid(s) your favorite memory of your mom or something you hear about her.

Stories about your mom are the perfect way to remember her on Mother’s Day. Your kid(s) would love to know about your childhood and hear about a tell mommy was truly happy, not a mess. The stories or memories will also show what kind of person your mom was like when she was alive. You’re not the only one missing out on your mom on Mother’s Day. Your kid(s) are missing her as well because he or she either never met your mom (like my daughter) or struggling with not having her present on Mother’s Day like in the past. Whatever your solution may be just share something to remember her in a positive way.

10) Lastly, you deserve a glass of wine after a long day.

Pour yourself a glass of wine and relax with a movie or show on Netflix. You can even read a book and take a bath. Either or, take the time to whine down and congratulate yourself for surviving yet another Mother’s Day being a motherless mom. Girl, you deserve it. You did it. You got through the toughest day of the year. Time to relax and get lost into a book, movie, or show with your glass of wine. CHEERS!

I hope my tips help you get through the day. Hang in there. Take a deep breath. Don’t forget today is your day as well.

Happy Mother’s Day!

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9 thoughts on “Here’s To Another Motherless Mother’s Day

  1. Samantha Smart says:

    This Mother Day was particularly tough for me. May 6th was the 10 year anniversary of my moms death then just 1 day before Mother’s Day we found out our next (and last) baby is a girl, who just happens to be due a week after my moms birthday and we have always talked about naming our girl after my mom. Don’t get me wrong, we are absolutely overjoyed with having a girl finally! But whew, it is quite an emotional situation. Just the three things combined made it an emotional May, and a rough Mother’s Day.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Confession of a Parentless Mother says:

      Ok this is strange because my dad’s birthday is on May 6th and his 10th death anniversary was on January 10th! Such a small world.

      I completely understand. May is just the worst. I’m glad I’m not alone on this though. I don’t know about you but it’s comforting knowing someone just hates me too. 😅

      Liked by 1 person

      • Samantha Smart says:

        I scrolled through a few of your other posts and also thought the dates were very close to my moms! Definitely a small world feeling!
        I also feel better knowing someone else understands. I went through it alone when she died (I was only 15) so it’s been nice to connect with others as an adult who have been there.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Confession of a Parentless Mother says:

        I’m so sorry you were alone and going through that! That’s awful! My heart aches for you.

        I was 19 when my dad died. Not as young as you but too young. I was 25 when my mom died, so I had time with her and cherish it so much especially when I hear how little time some had with their moms. I do wish she could have met my daughter and continue in my life, but it wasn’t meant to me. 😦

        Liked by 1 person

      • Samantha Smart says:

        It’s amazing how alike our stories are… 19 is still way too young! To think so many people have their parents in their 30s, 40s, even later. It’s amazing to me.
        Thankfully, I still have my dad. It’s been nice to have at least one of my parents around to meet my kiddos and spend time with them. I understand your heartache about wanting them around for your daughter. It’s tough being a parent and not having the loving grandparents around to watch their grand baby grow and learn 😔💞

        Liked by 1 person

      • Confession of a Parentless Mother says:

        I agree! You were meant to find my blog! 💜

        Omg I know. I’m like you’re so lucky to still have your mom and/or dad. I’m here wasting away. Haha. Not really but you know feeling like you are.

        I’m glad your kids have your dad at least. They can enjoy him then!!!! My daughter lucky does have two sets of grandparents though because my hubby’s parents are divorced and got remarried. But I will never forget the day she asked me which one is my parents … I had to tell her either and try to explain to her my parents are died. She was 3 at the time. Ughhhh.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Samantha Smart says:

        Oddly enough, I was searching blogs today to connect since I just started blogging. Which I did find some fantastic reads while I was at it!
        I have definitely been in that situation. My kids also have multiple sets of grandparents (biological, adopted, etc) and they have asked which one was my mom. It helped (for me) to explain that someone being your mom can be either biological or a choice. I choose to have these people as my “moms” because they love and care for me like a mom does. That seemed to help my kids understand a little better. They are also aware that my real mom died when I was younger. My kids were 4 and 3 when we first had the discussion. It has come up here and there sense then, but they are 7 and 6 now and much more aware of death and parents.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Confession of a Parentless Mother says:

        Haha I did the same thing and found some once I still enjoyed. 😆 … I will check yours out now.

        Oh I like that … have a mom figure. I guess you can say my hubby’s step mom and a friend’s mom because they’re always helping me with things I would go to my mom for.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Samantha Smart says:

        Thank you! I’ve only been here for a week, so I’m definitely not a seasoned vet like you 😜
        I’m glad you were able to find people who you can rely on in place of your mom. That has always been a large support in my life ❤️ It’s nice to have people step up too. It’s a great feeling!

        Liked by 1 person

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